ACRL/NY Meet-n-Greet, October 28

Are you a librarian who lives in the New York area and works in a college or research library?

Or, perhaps you are a student getting your degree in Library and Information Studies?

If so please join us at ACRL/NY’s fall meet-n-greet. This will be a great opportunity to network with colleagues, meet the ACRL/NY executive board, and learn about the many benefits of membership.

This event is free and open to all.

October 28, 2014
6:00-7:30 pm

Location:
ART/NY – Spaces @520
520 Eighth Avenue (between 36th and 37th Streets)
New York, NY 10018
3rd floor

Refreshments to be served. Please reserve your spot as early as possible. Space is limited.

RSVP to:
Keith Muchowski
New York City College of Technology (CUNY)
kmuchowski@citytech.cuny.edu

Please join the Greater New York Metropolitan Area Chapter of ACRL, the Association of College and Research Libraries at what will certainly be an informative and enjoyable evening.

Speed Mentoring, Resume Review, Networking​, Meet-n-Gre​et – June 18th

ACRL/NY Mentoring & New Librarians Discussion Group Meeting – June 18th

What: We will have a final wrap-up meeting for the mentoring program, combined with a meet-n-greet for the New Librarian’s Discussion Group.

When: Wednesday, June 18th, 5:30 – 7:30pm

Where: Jefferson Market Library, 425 Avenue of the Americas (at 10th St.) directions

This meeting is for current, past and future participants of the Mentoring Program, members of the New Librarians Discussion Group (NLDG) and anyone interested in finding out more about the NLDG, the Mentoring Program, and ACRL/NY. You do not have to be a member of ACRL/NY to attend this meeting, but you will need to join to be involved in the Mentoring Program and the NLDG. Membership information is listed below.

For the new(er) librarians, we will be providing speed mentoring (small group Q&As with experienced librarians), and resume review. We will also have time for networking and group discussions, as well as breakout discussions with just the mentors (or those thinking about becoming a mentor) and the mentees (or those thinking about becoming a mentee).

Snacks and drinks will be provided!

Registration Form: https://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/acrlny-mentoring-nldg-meeting-june-18th/

Questions?:
Susanne Markgren, coordinator, Mentoring Program
Haruko Yamauchi, co-chair, New Librarians Discussion Group
Linda Miles, co-chair, New Librarians Discussion Group

Agenda:
5:30 – 5:45 : Resume Review* (sign up when you register) + networking
5:45 – 6:00 : Speed Mentoring on Specific Topics** (sign up when you register)
6:00 – 6:30 : Introductions and Group Discussion
6:30 – 6:50 : Breakout Group Discussions – Mentors and Mentees
6:50 – 7:15 : Group Discussion. Questions. Wrap-up.
7:15 – 7:30 : Networking

*If you sign up for resume review, we will schedule you with a specific reviewer. Please arrive at 5:30 and bring a copy of your resume.

**If you sign up for speed mentoring, please arrive by 5:45, and groups will be determined at that time.

MEMBERSHIP
ACRL/NY is dedicated to improving library services, encouraging the exchange of ideas and information, providing networking opportunities for librarians and seeking greater cooperation among academic and research libraries. ACRL/NY promotes professional standards, mentors librarians, and enhances professional development through a variety of educational programs.

Membership fees:
Current member of ACRL national: $25
Non-member of ACRL national: $35
Library/information science student: $10
Retiree: $10

Membership Year
ACRL/NY membership is based on the calendar year. Membership paid on or after October 1 includes the following calendar year as well as the period between the date of payment and the end of calendar year. Join Now!

Registration Form: https://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/acrlny-mentoring-nldg-meeting-june-18th/

Academic Librarians’ Research/Writing Support Group — Coming Up May 16th

Are you in (or hope to be in) a tenure-track position? Do you need to publish or present at conferences/panels for your job? Do you need to write specific types of articles for specific types of publications? Or do you just want to write or present for the profession, because you enjoy it (or want to see your name in print)? Whatever the case, many of us do write, many of us intend to write, and many of us are required to publish/present as part of our jobs.

What: The Librarians’ Research/Writing Support Group has invited, ACRL/NY Member, Michael Handis to talk about generating writing topics and starting the research process, with plenty of time for group discussion and Q&A. We will also be spending some time checking in with everyone to see how your accountability buddies are working out (don’t worry if you don’t have one yet) and how everyone’s individual projects are progressing. This is an initiative of the ACRL/NY New Librarians Discussion Group and the Mentoring Program, but is open to librarians at any stage in their career as well as to library students.

It’s free! Beverages and snacks will be served!

To attend you must be an ACRL/NY member. Not a member of ACRL/NY? It costs little to join:

  • Base ACRL/NY membership: $35
  • Already a member of ACRL National?: $25
  • Library/Information science students: $10
  • Retirees: $10

Join now: http://www.acrlny.org/membership.htm

When: Friday, May 16th, from 9:30am – 10:45am
Where: Mercy College, Manhattan Campus, 66 West 35th St., room 731
(directions: https://www.mercy.edu/about-mercy-college/locations/manhattan/directions/)

Cost: Free!

Register by May 14th: https://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/acrlny-research-writing-support-group-meeting/

Note: You must register to attend and bring a picture ID. Space is limited and your name must appear on the security list.

Demystifying the Hiring Process – Panel Session

Back by popular demand!

When: Thursday, April 24, 6-8pm
Where: ART New York – 520 8th Avenue (between w. 36th and 37th St.), 3rd floor. (A/C/E or 1/2/3 to 34th St.) [directions]

Registration is required: http://bit.ly/DemystifyingACRL

Description:

What role does the traditional hiring committee play in the academic library hiring process? Who serves? How do they prepare? What happens during the day-long interview process? And what happens after the candidate leaves—how are decisions made?

Gain insight from four veterans of the hiring process, whose experience derives from a variety of academic library contexts and roles. We’d also like to hear from you: what are your experiences as a member of a hiring committee, as a new hire or as a job candidate? Bring your questions and your experience.

Panelists:

Madeline Ford, Chief Librarian | Hostos Community College Library, CUNY

Madeline Ford is currently serving as the Chief Librarian and the Chair of the Education Department at Hostos Community College, CUNY.   She has held library positions at Baruch, Hunter, Lehman, and Medgar Evers.  Madeline has served as the President of the Library Association of the City University of New York and the New York Black Librarians’ Caucus.   Her research interests are in the areas of information fluency, outreach, reference services, and immigration and migration of Caribbean born individuals.

Michael W. Handis, Special Projects Librarian | The Graduate Center, CUNY

Michael W. Handis currently works as the Reference and Metadata Librarian at the Graduate Center. As an administrator, cataloger and writer, Michael has witnessed the hiring process in libraries, having served on several search committees. He took three months of his sabbatical to live in Greece and study the archaeological ruins of ancient libraries. Last year, he had a chapter published by Cambridge on Galen and the Alexandrian library.

Mellissa Hinton, Assistant Dean, Technical & Digital Services | LIU Post

Mellissa J. Hinton has over thirty years of experience at the B. Davis Schwartz Memorial Library of LIU Post.  In her current position as Assistant Dean of Technical and Digital Services, she oversees acquisitions, cataloging, and digital initiatives.  She earned a B.A. in English from SUNY Oswego, an M.S. in information science from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science, an M.A. in English from LIU Post, and a D.A. in English from St. John’s University.

Kathryn G. Shaughnessy, Emerging Technologies & Instruction Librarian | St. John’s University Libraries

At St. John’s, Kathryn is the librarian coordinator for the Libraries’ Technology Lab, and serves as the embedded Librarian for the university’s Global Development & Social Justice MA program. She is a  Senior Fellow for both the Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and the Vincentian Center for Church and Society (VCCS). Her research interests include the promotion of Social Justice literacy, information literacy & technology literacy  in academic and civil sectors, focusing on information ethics, open access and scholarly communication initiatives. Externally, she serves as an expert observer for the Holy See Mission to the UN on matters related to  Gender and Information-Communication Technologies, and most recently, she was named a Community Representative for the Digital Public Library of America.

Moderator:
Haruko Yamauchi, Instruction and Reference Librarian | Hostos Community College, CUNY

Haruko Yamauchi (co-chair of the NLDG) is a recent survivor of the academic hiring process, and happily accepted her first full-time librarian position in August 2013, eight months after earning her MLS from Queens College.  She has an MFA in creative writing from the New School, an AB in visual arts from Brown, and is currently an instruction and reference librarian at Hostos Community College (CUNY).  She is a midlife career changer who learned that years of non-library experience (in arts education, writing, program facilitation, and translating, among other things) can be successfully transferred to the library world.

This event is co-sponsored by ACRL/NY’s New Librarian’s Discussion Group and the Mentoring Program. Light refreshments will be served.

Questions?:
Haruko Yamauchi, co-chair, New Librarian’s Discussion Group
Linda Miles, co-chair, New Librarian’s Discussion Group
Susanne Markgren, coordinator, Mentoring Program

Space is limited. Register here.

ACRL/NY Member: $5.00
ACRL Member: $7.00
Non member: $10.00

Join ACRL/NY!

We hope to see you there!

Wrap-up: Librarians’ Research/Writing Support Group 10/25

Thanks to all who made the meeting a big success. We discussed a number of issues we are facing individually in our research/writing lives, and came to some decisions about how we will move forward as a group.

Accountability partners: There are four basic purposes for these partnerships: accountability, encouragement, brainstorming, and advice. Partners correspond to set clear goals, and partners then follow up on or shortly after the date in question to see what progress is happening. Responsibility does not rise above the 4 purposes listed above

Critique/review of manuscripts, proposals, etc: If someone has a draft for which they would like feedback, we will notify the group as a whole so that one or more members can come forward to help as schedules allow.

Communications: The idea was floated to set up a Google group for open communication. See information on this issue under #2 above (in the information about the Meet-n-Greet/Social). Linda will set up a contacts list specifically for members who have attended or shown interest in the current research/writing support group. Broader announcements will be sent to a much larger list that includes non-members.

F2F meetings: We will meet at least twice per year, once in the fall and once in the spring. That meeting will include a presentation/facilitated discussion/workshop on a particular topic/issue, as well as a period for reporting on progress/discussion of issues that have come up for members as individuals. We ran out of time to figure out what we want that presentation/workshop to center on for the Spring, but set up a quick survey here: https://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/researchwriting-support-group-topic-survey/.

Resources: Resources and RSS feeds with calls-for-papers and etc. will be set up in the Mentoring Program website. Until that is live, relevant announcements can be sent to Linda (lmiles.librarian[at]gmail.com) and she will forward them to the group.

Would you like to get involved? ACRL/NY members who would like to participate can email lmiles.librarian[at]gmail.com, and we will set you up with an accountability partner.

Not yet a member? Join us!

News from the New Librarians Discussion Group

Thanks to everyone who made Tuesday’s NLDG/Mentoring event a success. For those of you unable to attend, here’s a recap. There’s a lot of info and links to relevant websites.

We enjoyed a nice combo of socializing/networking and info dissemination. Here are some of the things we discussed, with links.

The ACRL/NY Mentoring Program is underway for the year, with 20+ pairs of mentors and mentees, although if individuals are interested in joining in-progress, please fill out an application: http://acrlny.org/about2/mentoring-program/.

On Friday 10/25 the NLDG will meet for the Librarians Research/Writing Support Group. This is a program for academic librarians at any stage in their career who are interested in networking, collaboration, and support in research and writing projects. It will be only our second meeting, and we will also discuss various means for providing support that we may want to establish as part of the group’s activities. This is a free program for ACRL/NY members. More info and registration: https://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/librariansa-researchwriting-support-group/

Friday November 1st is the deadline for the ACRL/NY Symposium Scholarship for library school students.The award comprises waiver of the fee for the 2013 annual symposium, “The Library as Knowledge Laboratory,” which takes place on Dec. 6th at Baruch College Vertical Campus. Scholarship application: http://acrlnysymp2013.wordpress.com/scholarship/

On Thursday 11/7 there will be a book talk and reception celebrating Career Q & A by Susanne Markgren and Carrie Netzer Wajda. Built on the foundation of ten years spent answering library career questions, the book gathers excellent advice with excellent “sidebar” commentary from a wide range of librarians. Many of the contributors will be at the 11/7 event. More info and registration: http://metro.org/events/433/

On Friday 11/22 ACRL/NY & METRO will present parts III and IV of the workshop series Launch Your Library Career, “The Interview” from 9:30am – 12:30pm and “Networking , Publishing & Presenting” from 1:30-4:30pm. These are in-depth, practical, hands-on workshops. Discounts available for ACRL/NY and MyMETRO members. More info and registration: http://metro.org/events/435/ (“The Interview”); http://metro.org/events/436/ (“Networking, Publishing & Presenting”)

On Friday 12/6 is the date for the ACRL/NY Annual Symposium, The Library as Knowledge Laboratory. Here’s just the first line of the description, just as a tease “Makerspaces, mashups and big data are bringing radical change to higher education…” More info and registration: http://acrlnysymp2013.wordpress.com/

After more unstructured free time (networking), we provided a bit more info about how ACRL/NY supports new librarians. We have a New Librarians Discussion Group email list, which provides occasional email messages relevant to our group of new and early-career librarians (email lmiles.librarian@gmail.com to join). The NLDG also has a blog (http://acrlnynldg.wordpress.com/) and a twitter feed (https://twitter.com/NewLibrariansDG).

There are also a number of other discussion groups in ACRL/NY with interesting meetings and events. These include Distance Learning, First-Year Experience, Graduate Services, Information Literacy/Instruction, Resource Sharing, Library Management, and Archives. The ACRL/NY professional development committee is also very active, designing programming, engaging speakers and workshop leaders, and collaborating with other organizations, such as METRO, to bring PD opportunities to members and other librarians.

We also talked about how great the networking opportunities are. Joining the Symposium Planning Committee is a great place to start if you are interested in getting involved. It’s a large committee of people who have been mounting successful symposia for years, and the collegiality and mutual support make it a relatively easy endeavor. Meetings take place once a month on Friday mornings from January through June and September through November, with the event in December. If you’re interested in learning more email lmiles.librarian@gmail.com

We spent the rest of the session talking about possible programming for the year, and what kinds of issues are of most interest to members. An interesting suggestion came up to check out some analyses of job descriptions in order to identify some of the most requested skills/experiences and then develop workshops for these (e.g., developing online research guides). Another idea that came up was considering the concept of the “2nd masters,” and we had a great discussions of the pros and cons of preemptively working toward a degree if you weren’t in a job that required it. The idea of an instruction workshop came up as well. This has been a perennial concern of the group. There has been some discussion about collaborating with the IL/Instruction DG for an event, but it is likely that won’t happen until at least the Spring.

Wow. That’s a lot of info, I guess. Thanks again to everyone, especially my partner in crime, Susanne Markgren.

ACRL/NY & Metro Present 2 New Events: Launch Your Library Career, Parts III & IV

Part III

Friday, November 22, 2013 – 9:30 AM to 12:30 PM

The Interview — Putting Your Best Foot Forward:

You’ve mastered the resume and cover letter, and have been invited to interview foryour dream job. Now that you’ve been noticed, the challenge of wowing the hiring committee begins. Come dressed in your interview best for a hands-on workshop of mock interviews and interview coaching. During the workshop we’ll look at what to expect when interviewing at academic, special, and public libraries. We’ll discuss how to manage a panel of interviewers, the one-on-one interview, phone interviews and online (Skype) interviews, as well as the finer points of post-interview communications. We will discuss interview-appropriate attire, how to avoid common wardrobe pitfalls, and give you tips on staying comfortable yet looking professional. Participants will draft a 30-second elevator pitch that sums up their qualifications, experience, and professional interests. Throughout, we’ll emphasize how to go beyond the qualifications listed on your resume to talk about how and why you are the best candidate for the prospective employer’s needs. We will also look briefly at the basics of creating clean, professional-looking presentations and handouts, or any materials you may need to bring to an interview.

Visit http://metro.org/events/435/ for more information and registration.

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Part IV

Friday, November 22, 2013 – 1:30 PM to 4:30 PM

The Next Steps — Getting Started With Networking, Publishing, & Presenting:

Networking, publishing, and presenting are activities that you can do, or may want to do, at any and every stage in your career. Whether you choose to do them, or are required to do them, this hands-on workshop will show you that they do not have to be as intimidating or as formal as you may think, and that the act of “putting yourself out there” can be good for your career, your self-confidence, and your future job prospects. We will discuss ways to get involved in library organizations, at various levels, and guide attendees to specific organizations that meet their needs. We will talk about how networking and “joining” and keeping options open can change the course of one’s career. We will provide participants with tips and tools to help them get started with writing and presenting, starting with ideas — so bring yours! We will emphasize starting small and building on ideas and projects, and discuss the different kinds of publishing in our profession today. We will also discuss the benefits of collaborative writing and presenting. There will be brainstorming, writing, and presenting exercises, as well as time to research potential publications and editors, and time for group discussion and support.

Visit http://metro.org/events/436/ for more information and registration.